Best Pour Over Coffee Makers: The ULTIMATE Guide (Updated For 2020)

Best Pour Over Coffee Makers: The ULTIMATE Guide (Updated For 2020)

Have you ever been to a coffee shop and seen those conical devices sitting on top of mugs? The first time I saw one I was pretty intrigued.

How exactly did it work? Why didn’t the water just stream straight through the grounds and into my cup?

I ordered an Ethiopian blend from the shop’s “Today’s Special” board and enjoyed a delightfully fragrant and delicately balanced cup of coffee unlike anything I’d tried before.

(At the time I was really into dark roasts.)

I went home and researched manual drip coffee:

  • What is manual drip brewing?
  • How does it work?
  • What are the best pour over coffee makers?
  • Which material — ceramic, glass or other — is best?

I took the dive and purchased the Hario V60 and another bag of Ethiopian coffee to recreate that coffee shop’s masterpiece.

While my first try wasn’t quite as good, I was hooked on the process. Now I used pour over coffee makers for all of my lighter roasts.

Are you interested in learning about pour over coffee and manual drip brewing?

Welcome to The Coffee Maven’s Ultimate Guide.

Before we get to the individual reviews, let's take a look at our rankings for the Best Pour Over Coffee Maker.

Overall
94
Chemex Classic Series

Chemex Classic Series

Chemex Classic Series

Chemex Classic Series

Almost everyone knows Chemex. And if you don't know them by name, you probably know their signature design. Made in the USA, the Chemex Classic Series comes in 4 sizes from 15-50 oz and is perfectly designed for pour-over.
Overall
91
Hario Drip Pot

Hario Drip Pot

Hario Drip Pot

Hario Drip Pot

Functionally similar to the Chemex Classic Series but definitely rocking its own aesthetic, the Hario Drip Pot features a cloth filter, which offers advantages over paper and stainless steel but requires more maintenance.
Overall
91
Bodum Pour-Over

Bodum Pour-Over

Bodum Pour-Over

Bodum Pour-Over

A more affordable version of the Chemex Classic Series, the Bodum Pour-Over features Chemex's signature design plus a mesh filter and silicone collar. Though not as durable as the Chemex, this Bodum is a quality alternative.
Overall
91
Hario V60 Dripper

Hario V60 Dripper

Hario V60 Dripper

Hario V60 Dripper

The Hario V60 is one of the most popular pour-over coffee makers out there. Designed with vortex ridges to funnel your coffee away from the grounds, the V60 offers even, efficient extraction for a bright, balanced cup.
Overall
88
Bee House Ceramic Dripper

Bee House Ceramic Dripper

Bee House Ceramic Dripper

Bee House Ceramic Dripper

A durable, 100% ceramic pour-over coffee maker, the Bee House Ceramic Dripper uses vortex ridges to wick coffee into your cup through 2 holes in the dripper's flat bottom for an evenly-extracted, bright, vibrant cup.

We've rated and ranked each option you need to know about. Without further ado, here are our official reviews for the Best Pour Over Coffee Maker.

Chemex Classic Series

Chemex Classic Series
Overall Rating
94
Coffee Quality (40%)
95
Design & Features (20%)
93
Durability (20%)
93
Ease of Use (10%)
90
Brand Reputation (10%)
95

The Bottom Line

Almost everyone knows Chemex. And if you don't know them by name, you probably know their signature design. Made in the USA, the Chemex Classic Series comes in 4 sizes from 15-50 oz and is perfectly designed for pour-over.

Pros of the Chemex Classic Series

Pros of Chemex Classic Series

  • Models range up to 50 oz capacity
  • Stunning design
  • Durable, well-made glass

Cons of the Chemex Classic Series

Cons of Chemex Classic Series

  • Top end of pour over price range
  • Be careful not to get wood collar wet

Chemex Classic Series Overview

Chemex is a high-quality brand that’s established a lot of brand loyalty over the years. Their reputation has inspired plenty of knock-offs, but don’t fall for it or skimp on cost — you want the real deal.

Part of Chemex’s Classic Series and weighing in at 1.9 lbs, this pour over has thinner glass than the vintage Chemex models.

As far as the filter goes, you can choose paper or stainless steel, and there are pros and cons to each as detailed above.

You could use a stainless steel filter lined with a paper filter and get the best of both worlds, but obviously that’s a little more expensive (and complicated).

Plus, can we also agree that Chemex pour over brewers are beautiful works of art? And I just love the wood collar for a soft touch to an otherwise classy, elegant sculpture.

Just be careful not to get the wood collar wet when washing. The Chemex isn’t difficult to wash — just swirl with hot water and clean weekly with soap and a soft-bristled brush — but don’t get that collar wet.

Any complaints one would have about this pour over coffee maker are complaints they’d have with any pour over coffee maker: the time it takes to brew and the precision required to master your coffee.

Where can you find the Chemex Classic Series?

Where can you find Chemex Classic Series?

Find it on Amazon →
Find it on 1stInCoffee →
Find it on →
Check out the instead →

Hario Drip Pot

Hario Drip Pot
Overall Rating
91
Coffee Quality (40%)
93
Design & Features (20%)
88
Durability (20%)
90
Ease of Use (10%)
87
Brand Reputation (10%)
92

The Bottom Line

Functionally similar to the Chemex Classic Series but definitely rocking its own aesthetic, the Hario Drip Pot features a cloth filter, which offers advantages over paper and stainless steel but requires more maintenance.

Pros of the Hario Drip Pot

Pros of Hario Drip Pot

  • Cloth filter takes the best features of both paper and stainless steel
  • High quality Japanese design and make
  • Beautiful design

Cons of the Hario Drip Pot

Cons of Hario Drip Pot

  • Small 8 oz capacity
  • Cloth filter requires additional maintenance

Hario Drip Pot Overview

At just 240 mL in volume, the Hario Drip Pot is the smallest pour over coffee maker on our list — it makes just one 8-oz cup.

While that’s a significant drawback for a high-volume coffee drinker like myself, it may not be a negative for you. If you’re OK with the single-cup capacity, you just might enjoy the Hario Drip Pot.

This pour over coffee maker has a defining feature: It comes with a cloth filter.

Never used a cloth filter before and unsure whether it’s right for you?

Think of cloth filters this way: They’re basically reusable paper filters. They do a great job keeping fine sediment out of your coffee but you can wash them for extended use.

Cloth filters do stain from coffee oils, but you can clean this easily with bleach every few months.

Be warned, though: Hario recommends a lot of maintenance. You aren’t supposed to let it dry and it shouldn’t be cleaned with soap.

Instead, Hario suggests boiling it after use to remove any residual flavors. For storage, consider keeping it in a Tupperware container of water in your refrigerator, or to take up less space try sealing it in a Ziploc bag in the fridge.

In reality do you need to do all of those things? No, you don’t need to, but I’d recommend boiling it every few uses and at least storing it in a Ziploc bag.

Where can you find the Hario Drip Pot?

Where can you find Hario Drip Pot?

Find it on Amazon →
Find it on 1stInCoffee →
Find it on →
Check out the instead →

Bodum Pour-Over

Bodum Pour-Over
Overall Rating
91
Coffee Quality (40%)
92
Design & Features (20%)
90
Durability (20%)
90
Ease of Use (10%)
90
Brand Reputation (10%)
90

The Bottom Line

A more affordable version of the Chemex Classic Series, the Bodum Pour-Over features Chemex's signature design plus a mesh filter and silicone collar. Though not as durable as the Chemex, this Bodum is a quality alternative.

Pros of the Bodum Pour-Over

Pros of Bodum Pour-Over

  • Models range up to 51 oz
  • Comes with permanent mesh filter
  • Beautiful design

Cons of the Bodum Pour-Over

Cons of Bodum Pour-Over

  • Glass is pretty thin
  • Included permanent filter isn’t great quality
  • Silicone sleeve may not be wide enough to prevent touching hot glass

Bodum Pour-Over Overview

Similar in design to the Chemex Classic Series, the Bodum Pour-Over is a sleek and beautifully designed option for those who prefer manual drip brewing.

The Bodum brewer comes in three different sizes and 10 different silicone color combinations — one of which is just cork and not actually silicone — for a comfortable, temperature-resistant grip that resists water.

This is an important distinction between Bodum and Chemex as the above Chemex brewer has a wood collar that you have to be careful not to get wet.

The Bodum comes with a permanent mesh filter made of stainless steel mesh and a BPA-free plastic cage. It isn’t the best filter, though, and makes coffee that tastes and feels a little like French press coffee. I’d suggest getting a better mesh filter or, if you prefer paper filters, placing a paper filter in the permanent filter.

A word of caution: Be careful when handling this brewer. The glass is pretty thin. The 34 oz Bodum weighs 1.6 lbs compared to 1.9 lbs for the 30 oz Chemex. Some of that will be the weight difference between the silicone and wood collars, but some of it is the Bodum’s thinner glass.

Where can you find the Bodum Pour-Over?

Where can you find Bodum Pour-Over?

Find it on Amazon →
Find it on 1stInCoffee →
Find it on →
Check out the instead →

Hario V60 Dripper

Hario V60 Dripper
Overall Rating
91
Coffee Quality (40%)
92
Design & Features (20%)
87
Durability (20%)
92
Ease of Use (10%)
90
Brand Reputation (10%)
92

The Bottom Line

The Hario V60 is one of the most popular pour-over coffee makers out there. Designed with vortex ridges to funnel your coffee away from the grounds, the V60 offers even, efficient extraction for a bright, balanced cup.

Pros of the Hario V60 Dripper

Pros of Hario V60 Dripper

  • Vortex ridges prevent filter from sticking to brewer walls
  • Comes in 3 different sizes and materials
  • Small and compact

Cons of the Hario V60 Dripper

Cons of Hario V60 Dripper

  • Max size only 30 oz
  • Plastic and metal versions have some nuances as described in review

Hario V60 Dripper Overview

Unlike fully self-contained pour-over models like the Chemex Classic Series, the Hario V60 functions by sitting on top of your collecting vessel (fancy phrase for a mug).

The Hario V60 comes in three different sizes — 10 oz, 20 oz, and 30 oz — and comes in either ceramic, glass, plastic or metal.

Note: Not all size options offer each material, so check out the Amazon listing to see what’s available.

I also want to make a couple notes about the design differences between specific materials within the Hario V60 line:

  • Ceramic: Fully made of ceramic, no concerns
  • Glass: Glass body with plastic base, which sits on the mug
  • Plastic: Fully made of plastic, some report cracking around 1 year
  • Metal: Metal body with silicone base, which creates vacuum seal over mug and can cause issues with air displacement as mug fills with coffee

All sizes are compatible with mugs up to 4 inches in diameter, which is pretty darn big. The 20 oz model (size 02) is the standard size used in coffee shops. I wouldn’t get the 10 oz (size 01) unless you prefer thinner coffee or are OK with 8-10 oz cups.

See that ridged, vortex shape in the cross-section of the Hario V60? Those ridges stop the paper filter from sticking to the side of the cone, which prevents a vacuum from forming and ensures a constant, smooth flow.

This means you, the user, truly controls the brew speed as you manually pour hot water over the grounds.

Where can you find the Hario V60 Dripper?

Where can you find Hario V60 Dripper?

Find it on Amazon →
Find it on 1stInCoffee →
Find it on →
Check out the instead →

Bee House Ceramic Dripper

Bee House Ceramic Dripper
Overall Rating
88
Coffee Quality (40%)
90
Design & Features (20%)
85
Durability (20%)
90
Ease of Use (10%)
87
Brand Reputation (10%)
87

The Bottom Line

A durable, 100% ceramic pour-over coffee maker, the Bee House Ceramic Dripper uses vortex ridges to wick coffee into your cup through 2 holes in the dripper's flat bottom for an evenly-extracted, bright, vibrant cup.

Pros of the Bee House Ceramic Dripper

Pros of Bee House Ceramic Dripper

  • Durable make
  • 100% ceramic and comes in 9 colors
  • Vortex ridges prevent paper filter from sticking to side

Cons of the Bee House Ceramic Dripper

Cons of Bee House Ceramic Dripper

  • Heavy weight can sit awkwardly on mugs
  • Limited mug compatibility due to dimensions

Bee House Ceramic Dripper Overview

The Bee House Ceramic Coffee Dripper comes in 9 different colors and functions a little differently than the above pour overs.

Instead of having a coffee filter positioned directly over a large opening to a bottom chamber or coffee mug, the Bee House has a flat bottom with 2 holes from which coffee drips into your mug.

With its flat-bottom design, the Bee House Dripper takes single-use standard paper #2 filters, though you can also get by with a standard #4 coffee filter. This pour over coffee maker also is dishwasher safe, which makes it a ton easier to maintain than the Hario Drip Pot above.

Compared to the Hario V60, which is compatible with mugs up to 4 inches in diameter, the Bee House Dripper is compatible with mugs from 2.75-3.75 inches.

Oddly (and annoyingly) the base of this coffee maker is oval, which makes it a little less steady than the Hario V60.

Add in this coffee maker’s extra weight (the 14.4 oz Bee House weighs twice the Hario V60) and balancing it on top of your mug can be a little bit…unnerving.

Where can you find the Bee House Ceramic Dripper?

Where can you find Bee House Ceramic Dripper?

Find it on Amazon →
Find it on 1stInCoffee →
Find it on →
Check out the instead →

When you select your pour over coffee maker, you’ll need to make two choices:

  1. Glass vs ceramic vs plastic vs metal construction
  2. Paper or stainless steel filter

Let’s briefly evaluate the pros and cons of each.

Glass vs Ceramic vs Plastic vs Metal Coffee Makers

Pour over models primarily come in 4 different materials: glass, ceramic, plastic and metal. There are pros and cons to each type of material. Here’s the rundown:

  • Glass: There are 3 major benefits to glass coffee makers. First, glass is chemically inert and won’t impart any flavor on your coffee. Second, it insulates extremely well and keeps your blooming grounds at the proper temperature. Third, you can see what’s happening, which is both helpful and aesthetically pleasing.
  • Ceramic: The same benefits as glass above except ceramic isn’t transparent. White ceramic also stains more easily than glass and typically is thicker and heavier.
  • Plastic: Plastic coffee makers are most similar to ceramic, except plastic is much lighter and more easily transportable. The major downside of plastic is it’s generally not advisable to mix hot water and plastic for fear of leaching chemicals into your coffee.
  • Metal: The durability and thin, lightweight design are great, but metal coffee makers often impart a metallic flavor (surprise!) and don’t insulate well at all. This can cause your blooming coffee grounds to drop in temperature, affecting your extraction.

Paper vs Stainless Steel Filter

Paper Filters: They’re definitely cheaper. Some brands, like Chemex, recommend using their own more expensive paper filters, but generally you can get by using a standard #4 conical filter.

  • Pros to Paper: Lower cost and produce a slower, more deliberate brew with better extraction
  • Cons to Paper: Single-use and can absorb those wonderful coffee oils

Stainless Steel Filters: Can cost upwards of $60 (though you should be able to find one on sale for around $25) but they last a long time. However, to get a positive return on that initial investment, you’d need to make 200-400 brews with paper filters (at $6 per 40 filters). You’ll also have to be careful about ensuring the stainless steel filter you buy is compatible with the coffee maker you own.

  • Pros to Stainless Steel: Zero extraction of those flavorful oils!
  • Cons to Stainless Steel: Higher initial cost, require cleaning after every use and tend to let fine sediment into your coffee

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